A SOLDIER’S PRAYER I’m asking You God, to give me what You have left. Give me those things which others never ask of You. I don’t ask You for rest, or tranquility.
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A class of religion(s), including (in order of age) Judaism, Christianity and Islam, share a common ancestor in the story of Abraham. These religions are similar in that they hypothesise an all-powerful god (in heaven) and an antagonistic devil (in hell).
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Ahaṃkāra (अहंकार) is a Sanskrit term that is related to the ego and egoism - that is, the identification or attachment of one’s ego. The term “ahamkara” comes from an approximately 3,000 year-old Vedic philosophy, where Ahaṃ refers to the concept of the Self or “I” and kāra refers to the concept of “any created thing” or “to do”.
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The apocrypha are books deleted from the Abrahamic old testament:

  • Tobias
  • Judith
  • Jubillees - mentions the nephilim
  • Enoch - mentions the nephilim
  • Esther
  • Baruch
  • Sirach
  • Maccabees
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“Bardo” (བར་དོ, Sanskrit: antarabhāva) refers to an “intermediate state” between death and rebirth, a concept which supposedly arose shortly after the Buddha’s death. According to Tibetan tradition, after death and before one’s next birth, when one’s consciousness is not connected with a physical body, one experiences a variety of phenomena.
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Cerberus (pronounced /ˈsɜrbərəs/1), or Kerberos, (Greek: Κέρβερος) is a multi-headed hound (usually three-headed) which guards the gates of Hades, to prevent those who have crossed the river Styx from ever escaping.
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Chthonic (from Greek χθόνιος — chthonios, “in, under, or beneath the earth”, from χθών — chthōn “earth”; pertaining to the Earth; earthy; subterranean) designates, or pertains to, deities or spirits of the underworld, especially in relation to Greek religion.
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“The Devil” is an evil figure in the Abrahamic religions/mythos, defiant of the will of God and eternal opposer. The devil has many different names, and has a role in many of the Abrahamic holy books:
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“Diogenes the Cynic” (Διογένης ὁ Κυνικός, Diogenēs ho Kynikos) was a Greek philosopher, contemporary and critic of Plato and founder of ‘cynic’ philosophy. Banished from his birth town (Sinope)1, Diogenes moved to Athens and became a critic of “modern life” there, describing himself as a “citizen of the world” (cosmopolites) and living as a beggar.
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Epistemology (from Greek ἐπιστήμη (epistēmē), meaning “knowledge, science”, and λόγος (logos), meaning “the study of”) is the branch of philosophy concerned with the nature and scope (limitations) of knowledge itself:
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Gaea (pronounced /ˈɡeɪ.ə/ or /ˈɡaɪ.ə/; from Ancient Greek Γαῖα “land” or “earth”; also Gæa, Gaia or Gea, from Koine and Modern Greek Γῆ) is the primal Greek goddess personifying the Earth, the Greek version of “Mother Nature” or the Earth Mother, of which the earliest reference to the term is the Mycenaean Greek ma-ka (transliterated as ma-ga), “Mother Gaia”, written in Linear B syllabic script.
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The term “gaslighting” refers to when someone manipulates you into questioning and second-guessing your reality. It derives from a 1944 movie – and the play and another film that preceded it – in which this happens to the heroine.
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In religion, a powerful, immortal entity that may exist outside of space-time (but still have an effect on “reality”). Different religions may have one or many gods and goddesses: in a monotheistic religion (like Judaism, Christianity to a degree and Islam) they will not acknowledge foreign gods as “real”, and are likely to instead associate them with the devil.
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Hades (Άδης or Ἀΐδας; from Greek ᾍδης, Hadēs, originally Ἅιδης, Haidēs or Άΐδης, Aidēs, meaning “the unseen”) refers both to the ancient Greek underworld, the abode of Hades, and to the god of the underworld.
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In many religious traditions, Hell is a place of suffering and punishment in the afterlife, often ruled over by a powerful figure (the Devil). Religions with a linear divine history often depict Hell as endless.
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(in Christian theology) the renunciation of the divine nature, at least in part, by Christ in the Incarnation. … from Greek kenōsis ‘an emptying’, from kenoein ‘to empty’, from kenos ‘empty’, with biblical allusion (Phil.
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ॐ श्री महालक्ष्म्यै स्वाहा
om shreem mahalahkshiyai svaha
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Mesopotamian religion refers to the religious beliefs and practices of the civilizations of ancient Mesopotamia, particularly Sumer, Akkad, Assyria and Babylonia between circa 3500 BC and 400 AD, after which they largely gave way to Syriac Christianity.
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Metaphysics (from the Greek words μετά (metá) (“beyond” or “after”) and φυσικά (physiká) (“physics”)) is philosophy or philosophic thought about the nature of reality: what IS, and its properties. For example: the world appears to contain many “things” – physical objects (like apples) are called particulars, and possess properties (or universals).
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In Indian religions, moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष mokṣa) or mukti (Sanskrit: मुक्ति), literally “release” (both from a root muc “to let loose, let go”), is the liberation from saṃsāra and the concomitant suffering involved in being subject to the cycle of repeated death and reincarnation.
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The noosphere (sometimes noösphere) is the sphere of human thought. The word derives from the Greek νοῦς (nous “mind”) and σφαῖρα (sphaira “sphere”), in lexical analogy to “atmosphere” and “biosphere”.
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In Egyptian mythology, the Ogdoad (Greek “ογδοάς”, the eightfold) were eight deities worshipped in Hermopolis during what is called the Old Kingdom, the third through sixth dynasties, dated between 2686 to 2134 BC.
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Panpsychism is the idea that consciousness is a fundamental property of the physical universe, ubiquitous and all the way down to the subatomic level.

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Religion appears to be a philosophy and a social construct; a memeplex that promulgates and prolongs itself by the structures, edicts and forms it mandates (or less often “recommends”). Religious or spiritual behaviour (ritual, spirituality, mythology and magical thinking or animism) may be as old as the Paleolithic era – between 300,000 and 30,000 years ago i.
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Saṅsāra or Saṃsāra (sanskrit: संसार), literally meaning “continuous flow”, is the cycle of birth, life, death, rebirth or reincarnation) within Buddhism, Hinduism, Bön, Jainism, Sikhism, and other Indian religions. In Buddhism, the consciousness (consciousness of the different senses, such as eye consciousness, ear consciousness etc.
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Saṅkhāra (Pali; Devanagari: सङ्खार) or saṃskāra (Sanskrit; Devanagari: संस्कार) is a word meaning ‘that which has been put together’ and ‘that which puts together’. In the first (passive) sense, saṅkhāra refers to conditioned phenomena generally but specifically to all mental “dispositions”.
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Sheol (pronounced “Sheh-ol”), in Hebrew שְׁאוֹל (She’ol), is the “grave”, or “pit” or “abyss”. In Judaism She'ol is the earliest conception of the afterlife in the Jewish scriptures: a place of darkness to which all dead go, regardless of the moral choices made in life, and where they are "
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The Hebrew Bible (also Hebrew Scriptures, Latin Biblia Hebraica) is a term used by biblical scholars to refer to the Jewish Bible (Hebrew: תנ"ך Tanakh). It takes its name from the fact that the Jewish Bible is composed mostly in Biblical Hebrew, with a few passages in Biblical Aramaic (about half of the Book of Daniel, some parts of the Book of Ezra and a few other passages).
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Zarathustra Spitama (زرتشت‎‎ Zartosht or زردشت Zardosht in Persian; Ζωροάστρης in Greek; and  in Avestan) was an Avestan-speaking Persian who (if he actually existed?) was the author of the Yasna Haptanghaiti and the Gathas, and the spiritual founder of what became known as Zoroastrianism.
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