Language

I yearn to become a polyglot: to have at least a rudimentary ability in each of the languages listed within.

Mesopotamian Religion

Mesopotamian religion refers to the religious beliefs and practices of the civilizations of ancient Mesopotamia, particularly Sumer, Akkad, Assyria and Babylonia between circa 3500 BC and 400 AD, after which they largely gave way to Syriac Christianity.

Hades

Hades (Άδης or Ἀΐδας; from Greek ᾍδης, Hadēs, originally Ἅιδης, Haidēs or Άΐδης, Aidēs, meaning “the unseen”) refers both to the ancient Greek underworld, the abode of Hades, and to the god of the underworld.

Apocrypha

The apocrypha are books deleted from the Abrahamic old testament: Tobias Judith Jubillees - mentions the nephilim Enoch - mentions the nephilim Esther Baruch Sirach Maccabees

Sanskrit

Sanskrit (/ˈsænskrɪt/; संस्कृतम् saṃskṛtam [səmskr̩t̪əm], or संस्कृत saṃskṛta, originally संस्कृता वाक् saṃskṛtā vāk, “refined speech”) is the primary liturgical language of Hinduism, a philosophical language in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and a literary language that was in use as a lingua franca in the Indian cultural zone.

Gaia

Gaea (pronounced /ˈɡeɪ.ə/ or /ˈɡaɪ.ə/; from Ancient Greek Γαῖα “land” or “earth”; also Gæa, Gaia or Gea, from Koine and Modern Greek Γῆ) is the primal Greek goddess personifying the Earth, the Greek version of “Mother Nature” or the Earth Mother, of which the earliest reference to the term is the Mycenaean Greek ma-ka (transliterated as ma-ga), “Mother Gaia”, written in Linear B syllabic script.

Epistemology

Epistemology (from Greek ἐπιστήμη (epistēmē), meaning “knowledge, science”, and λόγος (logos), meaning “the study of”) is the branch of philosophy concerned with the nature and scope (limitations) of knowledge itself:

Devil

“The Devil” is an evil figure in the Abrahamic religions/mythos, defiant of the will of God and eternal opposer. The devil has many different names, and has a role in many of the Abrahamic holy books:

Socialisation Enhancements

Social tools are those that augment human social structures and capabilities with new communications channels, behavioural patterns and participant abilities. For example, the persistent “contactability” provided by mobile phones has altered our social expectations and enabled a whole range of behaviour: “swarming” to ad hoc events; “slow background conversations” and status updates via SMS; contact-details exchange allowing for very quick social link creation.

Memetics

Memes are the hypothetical “unit of transmission” in information-transfer within social environments i.e. “ideas” that pass from one entity to another in an almost viral way. Memetics provides an approach to evolutionary models of cultural information transfer based on the concept of the meme.