Mitochondria

Mitochondria (μίτος, mitos, “thread”, and χονδρίον, chondrion, “granule/grain-like”) are tiny organelles inside most eukaryotic cells which supply cellular energy (by releasing ATP), as well as other functions (cell growth & senescence, differentiation and signalling). Individual mitochondria can vary in size and the number in a cell by organism and cell-type. From wikipedia: There are two hypotheses about the origin of mitochondria: endosymbiotic and autogenous. The endosymbiotic hypothesis suggests that mitochondria were originally prokaryotic cells, capable of implementing oxidative mechanisms that were not possible for eukaryotic cells; they became endosymbionts living inside the eukaryote.
...more

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a molecule used to transfer chemical energy inside cells: a series of chemical reactions called the citric acid cycle (or Krebs cycle) allows the mitochondria in our cells to convert carbohydrates (i.e. glucose), fats and proteins into carbon dioxide (waste) and ATP, which is used for cell function. There is some evidence that a ketogenic diet is beneficial to the production of ATP by mitochondria within the brain.
...more

A neuron is an electrically excitable cell that processes and transmits information by electrical and chemical signaling. Chemical signaling occurs via synapses, specialized connections with other cells. Neurons connect to each other to form a neural network. Neurons are the core components of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral ganglia. A number of specialized types of neurons exist: sensory neurons respond to touch, sound, light and numerous other stimuli affecting cells of the sensory organs that then send signals to the spinal cord and brain; motor neurons receive signals from the brain and spinal cord, cause muscle contractions, and affect glands; and interneurons connect neurons to other neurons within the same region of the brain or spinal cord.
...more

A “ketogenic” diet is low in carbohydrates, high in fats and moderate in protein. When you consume carbohydrates (or excess protein), the body breaks it down into an easy-to-use sugar called glucose. It will also produce insulin, which “signals” the presence of glucose in your bloodstream – and when our insulin production becomes “fatigued”/maladapted (from too much glucose too often) we call it diabetes. From keto-fied: There are two main things that happen to glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis.
...more

“Transhumanism” is the intellectual movement and/or philosophy that believes in human augmentation as a means of “improving the human condition” i.e. eliminating suffering, extending life (and ultimately curing death) and providing humans with integrated tools and techniques (such as improved or entirely new sensory apparatus, communications and socialisation enhancements, and intelligence amplification). Transhumanists believe that we can – and ultimately must – engineer ourselves into a new species that is better suited for the environments and cultures we have created for ourselves.
...more

“User Experience”: the recognition that the interaction with systems (especially “smart” systems) goes beyond the user interface (UI). From wikipedia: “User experience (UX) is the way a person feels about using a product, system or service. User experience highlights the experiential, affective, meaningful and valuable aspects of human-computer interaction and product ownership, but it also includes a person’s perceptions of the practical aspects such as utility, ease of use and efficiency of the system.
...more

Zarathustra Spitama (زرتشت‎‎ Zartosht or زردشت Zardosht in Persian; Ζωροάστρης in Greek; and  in Avestan) was an Avestan-speaking Persian who (if he actually existed?) was the author of the Yasna Haptanghaiti and the Gathas, and the spiritual founder of what became known as Zoroastrianism. This was the official religion of Persia from 600 BCE to 650 CE (1250 years!!), but was suppressed by Islamic conquest of Persia from the 7th century.
...more

Saṅsāra or Saṃsāra (sanskrit: संसार), literally meaning “continuous flow”, is the cycle of birth, life, death, rebirth or reincarnation) within Buddhism, Hinduism, Bön, Jainism, Sikhism, and other Indian religions. In Buddhism, the consciousness (consciousness of the different senses, such as eye consciousness, ear consciousness etc.), at the moment of death, act as the seed for the spawning of the new consciousness in a new biological structure, conducive to the volitional (saṅkhāras) impulses at the moment of death (which are themselves affected by previous volitional impulses).
...more

In Indian religions, moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष mokṣa) or mukti (Sanskrit: मुक्ति), literally “release” (both from a root muc “to let loose, let go”), is the liberation from saṃsāra and the concomitant suffering involved in being subject to the cycle of repeated death and reincarnation.

...more

The noosphere (sometimes noösphere) is the sphere of human thought. The word derives from the Greek νοῦς (nous “mind”) and σφαῖρα (sphaira “sphere”), in lexical analogy to “atmosphere” and “biosphere”. It was introduced by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin in 1922 in his Cosmogenesis.

...more

ATP

Mitochondria (μίτος, mitos, “thread”, and χονδρίον, chondrion, “granule/grain-like”) are tiny organelles inside most eukaryotic cells which supply cellular energy (by releasing ATP), as well as other functions (cell growth & senescence, differentiation and signalling). Individual mitochondria can vary in size and the number in a cell by organism and cell-type. From wikipedia: There are two hypotheses about the origin of mitochondria: endosymbiotic and autogenous. The endosymbiotic hypothesis suggests that mitochondria were originally prokaryotic cells, capable of implementing oxidative mechanisms that were not possible for eukaryotic cells; they became endosymbionts living inside the eukaryote.
...more

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a molecule used to transfer chemical energy inside cells: a series of chemical reactions called the citric acid cycle (or Krebs cycle) allows the mitochondria in our cells to convert carbohydrates (i.e. glucose), fats and proteins into carbon dioxide (waste) and ATP, which is used for cell function. There is some evidence that a ketogenic diet is beneficial to the production of ATP by mitochondria within the brain.
...more

A neuron is an electrically excitable cell that processes and transmits information by electrical and chemical signaling. Chemical signaling occurs via synapses, specialized connections with other cells. Neurons connect to each other to form a neural network. Neurons are the core components of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral ganglia. A number of specialized types of neurons exist: sensory neurons respond to touch, sound, light and numerous other stimuli affecting cells of the sensory organs that then send signals to the spinal cord and brain; motor neurons receive signals from the brain and spinal cord, cause muscle contractions, and affect glands; and interneurons connect neurons to other neurons within the same region of the brain or spinal cord.
...more

A “ketogenic” diet is low in carbohydrates, high in fats and moderate in protein. When you consume carbohydrates (or excess protein), the body breaks it down into an easy-to-use sugar called glucose. It will also produce insulin, which “signals” the presence of glucose in your bloodstream – and when our insulin production becomes “fatigued”/maladapted (from too much glucose too often) we call it diabetes. From keto-fied: There are two main things that happen to glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis.
...more

“Transhumanism” is the intellectual movement and/or philosophy that believes in human augmentation as a means of “improving the human condition” i.e. eliminating suffering, extending life (and ultimately curing death) and providing humans with integrated tools and techniques (such as improved or entirely new sensory apparatus, communications and socialisation enhancements, and intelligence amplification). Transhumanists believe that we can – and ultimately must – engineer ourselves into a new species that is better suited for the environments and cultures we have created for ourselves.
...more

“User Experience”: the recognition that the interaction with systems (especially “smart” systems) goes beyond the user interface (UI). From wikipedia: “User experience (UX) is the way a person feels about using a product, system or service. User experience highlights the experiential, affective, meaningful and valuable aspects of human-computer interaction and product ownership, but it also includes a person’s perceptions of the practical aspects such as utility, ease of use and efficiency of the system.
...more

Zarathustra Spitama (زرتشت‎‎ Zartosht or زردشت Zardosht in Persian; Ζωροάστρης in Greek; and  in Avestan) was an Avestan-speaking Persian who (if he actually existed?) was the author of the Yasna Haptanghaiti and the Gathas, and the spiritual founder of what became known as Zoroastrianism. This was the official religion of Persia from 600 BCE to 650 CE (1250 years!!), but was suppressed by Islamic conquest of Persia from the 7th century.
...more

Saṅsāra or Saṃsāra (sanskrit: संसार), literally meaning “continuous flow”, is the cycle of birth, life, death, rebirth or reincarnation) within Buddhism, Hinduism, Bön, Jainism, Sikhism, and other Indian religions. In Buddhism, the consciousness (consciousness of the different senses, such as eye consciousness, ear consciousness etc.), at the moment of death, act as the seed for the spawning of the new consciousness in a new biological structure, conducive to the volitional (saṅkhāras) impulses at the moment of death (which are themselves affected by previous volitional impulses).
...more

In Indian religions, moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष mokṣa) or mukti (Sanskrit: मुक्ति), literally “release” (both from a root muc “to let loose, let go”), is the liberation from saṃsāra and the concomitant suffering involved in being subject to the cycle of repeated death and reincarnation.

...more

The noosphere (sometimes noösphere) is the sphere of human thought. The word derives from the Greek νοῦς (nous “mind”) and σφαῖρα (sphaira “sphere”), in lexical analogy to “atmosphere” and “biosphere”. It was introduced by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin in 1922 in his Cosmogenesis.

...more

Neurons

Mitochondria (μίτος, mitos, “thread”, and χονδρίον, chondrion, “granule/grain-like”) are tiny organelles inside most eukaryotic cells which supply cellular energy (by releasing ATP), as well as other functions (cell growth & senescence, differentiation and signalling). Individual mitochondria can vary in size and the number in a cell by organism and cell-type. From wikipedia: There are two hypotheses about the origin of mitochondria: endosymbiotic and autogenous. The endosymbiotic hypothesis suggests that mitochondria were originally prokaryotic cells, capable of implementing oxidative mechanisms that were not possible for eukaryotic cells; they became endosymbionts living inside the eukaryote.
...more

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a molecule used to transfer chemical energy inside cells: a series of chemical reactions called the citric acid cycle (or Krebs cycle) allows the mitochondria in our cells to convert carbohydrates (i.e. glucose), fats and proteins into carbon dioxide (waste) and ATP, which is used for cell function. There is some evidence that a ketogenic diet is beneficial to the production of ATP by mitochondria within the brain.
...more

A neuron is an electrically excitable cell that processes and transmits information by electrical and chemical signaling. Chemical signaling occurs via synapses, specialized connections with other cells. Neurons connect to each other to form a neural network. Neurons are the core components of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral ganglia. A number of specialized types of neurons exist: sensory neurons respond to touch, sound, light and numerous other stimuli affecting cells of the sensory organs that then send signals to the spinal cord and brain; motor neurons receive signals from the brain and spinal cord, cause muscle contractions, and affect glands; and interneurons connect neurons to other neurons within the same region of the brain or spinal cord.
...more

A “ketogenic” diet is low in carbohydrates, high in fats and moderate in protein. When you consume carbohydrates (or excess protein), the body breaks it down into an easy-to-use sugar called glucose. It will also produce insulin, which “signals” the presence of glucose in your bloodstream – and when our insulin production becomes “fatigued”/maladapted (from too much glucose too often) we call it diabetes. From keto-fied: There are two main things that happen to glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis.
...more

“Transhumanism” is the intellectual movement and/or philosophy that believes in human augmentation as a means of “improving the human condition” i.e. eliminating suffering, extending life (and ultimately curing death) and providing humans with integrated tools and techniques (such as improved or entirely new sensory apparatus, communications and socialisation enhancements, and intelligence amplification). Transhumanists believe that we can – and ultimately must – engineer ourselves into a new species that is better suited for the environments and cultures we have created for ourselves.
...more

“User Experience”: the recognition that the interaction with systems (especially “smart” systems) goes beyond the user interface (UI). From wikipedia: “User experience (UX) is the way a person feels about using a product, system or service. User experience highlights the experiential, affective, meaningful and valuable aspects of human-computer interaction and product ownership, but it also includes a person’s perceptions of the practical aspects such as utility, ease of use and efficiency of the system.
...more

Zarathustra Spitama (زرتشت‎‎ Zartosht or زردشت Zardosht in Persian; Ζωροάστρης in Greek; and  in Avestan) was an Avestan-speaking Persian who (if he actually existed?) was the author of the Yasna Haptanghaiti and the Gathas, and the spiritual founder of what became known as Zoroastrianism. This was the official religion of Persia from 600 BCE to 650 CE (1250 years!!), but was suppressed by Islamic conquest of Persia from the 7th century.
...more

Saṅsāra or Saṃsāra (sanskrit: संसार), literally meaning “continuous flow”, is the cycle of birth, life, death, rebirth or reincarnation) within Buddhism, Hinduism, Bön, Jainism, Sikhism, and other Indian religions. In Buddhism, the consciousness (consciousness of the different senses, such as eye consciousness, ear consciousness etc.), at the moment of death, act as the seed for the spawning of the new consciousness in a new biological structure, conducive to the volitional (saṅkhāras) impulses at the moment of death (which are themselves affected by previous volitional impulses).
...more

In Indian religions, moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष mokṣa) or mukti (Sanskrit: मुक्ति), literally “release” (both from a root muc “to let loose, let go”), is the liberation from saṃsāra and the concomitant suffering involved in being subject to the cycle of repeated death and reincarnation.

...more

The noosphere (sometimes noösphere) is the sphere of human thought. The word derives from the Greek νοῦς (nous “mind”) and σφαῖρα (sphaira “sphere”), in lexical analogy to “atmosphere” and “biosphere”. It was introduced by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin in 1922 in his Cosmogenesis.

...more

Ketogenic

Mitochondria (μίτος, mitos, “thread”, and χονδρίον, chondrion, “granule/grain-like”) are tiny organelles inside most eukaryotic cells which supply cellular energy (by releasing ATP), as well as other functions (cell growth & senescence, differentiation and signalling). Individual mitochondria can vary in size and the number in a cell by organism and cell-type. From wikipedia: There are two hypotheses about the origin of mitochondria: endosymbiotic and autogenous. The endosymbiotic hypothesis suggests that mitochondria were originally prokaryotic cells, capable of implementing oxidative mechanisms that were not possible for eukaryotic cells; they became endosymbionts living inside the eukaryote.
...more

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a molecule used to transfer chemical energy inside cells: a series of chemical reactions called the citric acid cycle (or Krebs cycle) allows the mitochondria in our cells to convert carbohydrates (i.e. glucose), fats and proteins into carbon dioxide (waste) and ATP, which is used for cell function. There is some evidence that a ketogenic diet is beneficial to the production of ATP by mitochondria within the brain.
...more

A neuron is an electrically excitable cell that processes and transmits information by electrical and chemical signaling. Chemical signaling occurs via synapses, specialized connections with other cells. Neurons connect to each other to form a neural network. Neurons are the core components of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral ganglia. A number of specialized types of neurons exist: sensory neurons respond to touch, sound, light and numerous other stimuli affecting cells of the sensory organs that then send signals to the spinal cord and brain; motor neurons receive signals from the brain and spinal cord, cause muscle contractions, and affect glands; and interneurons connect neurons to other neurons within the same region of the brain or spinal cord.
...more

A “ketogenic” diet is low in carbohydrates, high in fats and moderate in protein. When you consume carbohydrates (or excess protein), the body breaks it down into an easy-to-use sugar called glucose. It will also produce insulin, which “signals” the presence of glucose in your bloodstream – and when our insulin production becomes “fatigued”/maladapted (from too much glucose too often) we call it diabetes. From keto-fied: There are two main things that happen to glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis.
...more

“Transhumanism” is the intellectual movement and/or philosophy that believes in human augmentation as a means of “improving the human condition” i.e. eliminating suffering, extending life (and ultimately curing death) and providing humans with integrated tools and techniques (such as improved or entirely new sensory apparatus, communications and socialisation enhancements, and intelligence amplification). Transhumanists believe that we can – and ultimately must – engineer ourselves into a new species that is better suited for the environments and cultures we have created for ourselves.
...more

“User Experience”: the recognition that the interaction with systems (especially “smart” systems) goes beyond the user interface (UI). From wikipedia: “User experience (UX) is the way a person feels about using a product, system or service. User experience highlights the experiential, affective, meaningful and valuable aspects of human-computer interaction and product ownership, but it also includes a person’s perceptions of the practical aspects such as utility, ease of use and efficiency of the system.
...more

Zarathustra Spitama (زرتشت‎‎ Zartosht or زردشت Zardosht in Persian; Ζωροάστρης in Greek; and  in Avestan) was an Avestan-speaking Persian who (if he actually existed?) was the author of the Yasna Haptanghaiti and the Gathas, and the spiritual founder of what became known as Zoroastrianism. This was the official religion of Persia from 600 BCE to 650 CE (1250 years!!), but was suppressed by Islamic conquest of Persia from the 7th century.
...more

Saṅsāra or Saṃsāra (sanskrit: संसार), literally meaning “continuous flow”, is the cycle of birth, life, death, rebirth or reincarnation) within Buddhism, Hinduism, Bön, Jainism, Sikhism, and other Indian religions. In Buddhism, the consciousness (consciousness of the different senses, such as eye consciousness, ear consciousness etc.), at the moment of death, act as the seed for the spawning of the new consciousness in a new biological structure, conducive to the volitional (saṅkhāras) impulses at the moment of death (which are themselves affected by previous volitional impulses).
...more

In Indian religions, moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष mokṣa) or mukti (Sanskrit: मुक्ति), literally “release” (both from a root muc “to let loose, let go”), is the liberation from saṃsāra and the concomitant suffering involved in being subject to the cycle of repeated death and reincarnation.

...more

The noosphere (sometimes noösphere) is the sphere of human thought. The word derives from the Greek νοῦς (nous “mind”) and σφαῖρα (sphaira “sphere”), in lexical analogy to “atmosphere” and “biosphere”. It was introduced by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin in 1922 in his Cosmogenesis.

...more

Transhumanism

Mitochondria (μίτος, mitos, “thread”, and χονδρίον, chondrion, “granule/grain-like”) are tiny organelles inside most eukaryotic cells which supply cellular energy (by releasing ATP), as well as other functions (cell growth & senescence, differentiation and signalling). Individual mitochondria can vary in size and the number in a cell by organism and cell-type. From wikipedia: There are two hypotheses about the origin of mitochondria: endosymbiotic and autogenous. The endosymbiotic hypothesis suggests that mitochondria were originally prokaryotic cells, capable of implementing oxidative mechanisms that were not possible for eukaryotic cells; they became endosymbionts living inside the eukaryote.
...more

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a molecule used to transfer chemical energy inside cells: a series of chemical reactions called the citric acid cycle (or Krebs cycle) allows the mitochondria in our cells to convert carbohydrates (i.e. glucose), fats and proteins into carbon dioxide (waste) and ATP, which is used for cell function. There is some evidence that a ketogenic diet is beneficial to the production of ATP by mitochondria within the brain.
...more

A neuron is an electrically excitable cell that processes and transmits information by electrical and chemical signaling. Chemical signaling occurs via synapses, specialized connections with other cells. Neurons connect to each other to form a neural network. Neurons are the core components of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral ganglia. A number of specialized types of neurons exist: sensory neurons respond to touch, sound, light and numerous other stimuli affecting cells of the sensory organs that then send signals to the spinal cord and brain; motor neurons receive signals from the brain and spinal cord, cause muscle contractions, and affect glands; and interneurons connect neurons to other neurons within the same region of the brain or spinal cord.
...more

A “ketogenic” diet is low in carbohydrates, high in fats and moderate in protein. When you consume carbohydrates (or excess protein), the body breaks it down into an easy-to-use sugar called glucose. It will also produce insulin, which “signals” the presence of glucose in your bloodstream – and when our insulin production becomes “fatigued”/maladapted (from too much glucose too often) we call it diabetes. From keto-fied: There are two main things that happen to glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis.
...more

“Transhumanism” is the intellectual movement and/or philosophy that believes in human augmentation as a means of “improving the human condition” i.e. eliminating suffering, extending life (and ultimately curing death) and providing humans with integrated tools and techniques (such as improved or entirely new sensory apparatus, communications and socialisation enhancements, and intelligence amplification). Transhumanists believe that we can – and ultimately must – engineer ourselves into a new species that is better suited for the environments and cultures we have created for ourselves.
...more

“User Experience”: the recognition that the interaction with systems (especially “smart” systems) goes beyond the user interface (UI). From wikipedia: “User experience (UX) is the way a person feels about using a product, system or service. User experience highlights the experiential, affective, meaningful and valuable aspects of human-computer interaction and product ownership, but it also includes a person’s perceptions of the practical aspects such as utility, ease of use and efficiency of the system.
...more

Zarathustra Spitama (زرتشت‎‎ Zartosht or زردشت Zardosht in Persian; Ζωροάστρης in Greek; and  in Avestan) was an Avestan-speaking Persian who (if he actually existed?) was the author of the Yasna Haptanghaiti and the Gathas, and the spiritual founder of what became known as Zoroastrianism. This was the official religion of Persia from 600 BCE to 650 CE (1250 years!!), but was suppressed by Islamic conquest of Persia from the 7th century.
...more

Saṅsāra or Saṃsāra (sanskrit: संसार), literally meaning “continuous flow”, is the cycle of birth, life, death, rebirth or reincarnation) within Buddhism, Hinduism, Bön, Jainism, Sikhism, and other Indian religions. In Buddhism, the consciousness (consciousness of the different senses, such as eye consciousness, ear consciousness etc.), at the moment of death, act as the seed for the spawning of the new consciousness in a new biological structure, conducive to the volitional (saṅkhāras) impulses at the moment of death (which are themselves affected by previous volitional impulses).
...more

In Indian religions, moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष mokṣa) or mukti (Sanskrit: मुक्ति), literally “release” (both from a root muc “to let loose, let go”), is the liberation from saṃsāra and the concomitant suffering involved in being subject to the cycle of repeated death and reincarnation.

...more

The noosphere (sometimes noösphere) is the sphere of human thought. The word derives from the Greek νοῦς (nous “mind”) and σφαῖρα (sphaira “sphere”), in lexical analogy to “atmosphere” and “biosphere”. It was introduced by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin in 1922 in his Cosmogenesis.

...more

Ux

Mitochondria (μίτος, mitos, “thread”, and χονδρίον, chondrion, “granule/grain-like”) are tiny organelles inside most eukaryotic cells which supply cellular energy (by releasing ATP), as well as other functions (cell growth & senescence, differentiation and signalling). Individual mitochondria can vary in size and the number in a cell by organism and cell-type. From wikipedia: There are two hypotheses about the origin of mitochondria: endosymbiotic and autogenous. The endosymbiotic hypothesis suggests that mitochondria were originally prokaryotic cells, capable of implementing oxidative mechanisms that were not possible for eukaryotic cells; they became endosymbionts living inside the eukaryote.
...more

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a molecule used to transfer chemical energy inside cells: a series of chemical reactions called the citric acid cycle (or Krebs cycle) allows the mitochondria in our cells to convert carbohydrates (i.e. glucose), fats and proteins into carbon dioxide (waste) and ATP, which is used for cell function. There is some evidence that a ketogenic diet is beneficial to the production of ATP by mitochondria within the brain.
...more

A neuron is an electrically excitable cell that processes and transmits information by electrical and chemical signaling. Chemical signaling occurs via synapses, specialized connections with other cells. Neurons connect to each other to form a neural network. Neurons are the core components of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral ganglia. A number of specialized types of neurons exist: sensory neurons respond to touch, sound, light and numerous other stimuli affecting cells of the sensory organs that then send signals to the spinal cord and brain; motor neurons receive signals from the brain and spinal cord, cause muscle contractions, and affect glands; and interneurons connect neurons to other neurons within the same region of the brain or spinal cord.
...more

A “ketogenic” diet is low in carbohydrates, high in fats and moderate in protein. When you consume carbohydrates (or excess protein), the body breaks it down into an easy-to-use sugar called glucose. It will also produce insulin, which “signals” the presence of glucose in your bloodstream – and when our insulin production becomes “fatigued”/maladapted (from too much glucose too often) we call it diabetes. From keto-fied: There are two main things that happen to glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis.
...more

“Transhumanism” is the intellectual movement and/or philosophy that believes in human augmentation as a means of “improving the human condition” i.e. eliminating suffering, extending life (and ultimately curing death) and providing humans with integrated tools and techniques (such as improved or entirely new sensory apparatus, communications and socialisation enhancements, and intelligence amplification). Transhumanists believe that we can – and ultimately must – engineer ourselves into a new species that is better suited for the environments and cultures we have created for ourselves.
...more

“User Experience”: the recognition that the interaction with systems (especially “smart” systems) goes beyond the user interface (UI). From wikipedia: “User experience (UX) is the way a person feels about using a product, system or service. User experience highlights the experiential, affective, meaningful and valuable aspects of human-computer interaction and product ownership, but it also includes a person’s perceptions of the practical aspects such as utility, ease of use and efficiency of the system.
...more

Zarathustra Spitama (زرتشت‎‎ Zartosht or زردشت Zardosht in Persian; Ζωροάστρης in Greek; and  in Avestan) was an Avestan-speaking Persian who (if he actually existed?) was the author of the Yasna Haptanghaiti and the Gathas, and the spiritual founder of what became known as Zoroastrianism. This was the official religion of Persia from 600 BCE to 650 CE (1250 years!!), but was suppressed by Islamic conquest of Persia from the 7th century.
...more

Saṅsāra or Saṃsāra (sanskrit: संसार), literally meaning “continuous flow”, is the cycle of birth, life, death, rebirth or reincarnation) within Buddhism, Hinduism, Bön, Jainism, Sikhism, and other Indian religions. In Buddhism, the consciousness (consciousness of the different senses, such as eye consciousness, ear consciousness etc.), at the moment of death, act as the seed for the spawning of the new consciousness in a new biological structure, conducive to the volitional (saṅkhāras) impulses at the moment of death (which are themselves affected by previous volitional impulses).
...more

In Indian religions, moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष mokṣa) or mukti (Sanskrit: मुक्ति), literally “release” (both from a root muc “to let loose, let go”), is the liberation from saṃsāra and the concomitant suffering involved in being subject to the cycle of repeated death and reincarnation.

...more

The noosphere (sometimes noösphere) is the sphere of human thought. The word derives from the Greek νοῦς (nous “mind”) and σφαῖρα (sphaira “sphere”), in lexical analogy to “atmosphere” and “biosphere”. It was introduced by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin in 1922 in his Cosmogenesis.

...more

Zarathustra

Mitochondria (μίτος, mitos, “thread”, and χονδρίον, chondrion, “granule/grain-like”) are tiny organelles inside most eukaryotic cells which supply cellular energy (by releasing ATP), as well as other functions (cell growth & senescence, differentiation and signalling). Individual mitochondria can vary in size and the number in a cell by organism and cell-type. From wikipedia: There are two hypotheses about the origin of mitochondria: endosymbiotic and autogenous. The endosymbiotic hypothesis suggests that mitochondria were originally prokaryotic cells, capable of implementing oxidative mechanisms that were not possible for eukaryotic cells; they became endosymbionts living inside the eukaryote.
...more

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a molecule used to transfer chemical energy inside cells: a series of chemical reactions called the citric acid cycle (or Krebs cycle) allows the mitochondria in our cells to convert carbohydrates (i.e. glucose), fats and proteins into carbon dioxide (waste) and ATP, which is used for cell function. There is some evidence that a ketogenic diet is beneficial to the production of ATP by mitochondria within the brain.
...more

A neuron is an electrically excitable cell that processes and transmits information by electrical and chemical signaling. Chemical signaling occurs via synapses, specialized connections with other cells. Neurons connect to each other to form a neural network. Neurons are the core components of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral ganglia. A number of specialized types of neurons exist: sensory neurons respond to touch, sound, light and numerous other stimuli affecting cells of the sensory organs that then send signals to the spinal cord and brain; motor neurons receive signals from the brain and spinal cord, cause muscle contractions, and affect glands; and interneurons connect neurons to other neurons within the same region of the brain or spinal cord.
...more

A “ketogenic” diet is low in carbohydrates, high in fats and moderate in protein. When you consume carbohydrates (or excess protein), the body breaks it down into an easy-to-use sugar called glucose. It will also produce insulin, which “signals” the presence of glucose in your bloodstream – and when our insulin production becomes “fatigued”/maladapted (from too much glucose too often) we call it diabetes. From keto-fied: There are two main things that happen to glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis.
...more

“Transhumanism” is the intellectual movement and/or philosophy that believes in human augmentation as a means of “improving the human condition” i.e. eliminating suffering, extending life (and ultimately curing death) and providing humans with integrated tools and techniques (such as improved or entirely new sensory apparatus, communications and socialisation enhancements, and intelligence amplification). Transhumanists believe that we can – and ultimately must – engineer ourselves into a new species that is better suited for the environments and cultures we have created for ourselves.
...more

“User Experience”: the recognition that the interaction with systems (especially “smart” systems) goes beyond the user interface (UI). From wikipedia: “User experience (UX) is the way a person feels about using a product, system or service. User experience highlights the experiential, affective, meaningful and valuable aspects of human-computer interaction and product ownership, but it also includes a person’s perceptions of the practical aspects such as utility, ease of use and efficiency of the system.
...more

Zarathustra Spitama (زرتشت‎‎ Zartosht or زردشت Zardosht in Persian; Ζωροάστρης in Greek; and  in Avestan) was an Avestan-speaking Persian who (if he actually existed?) was the author of the Yasna Haptanghaiti and the Gathas, and the spiritual founder of what became known as Zoroastrianism. This was the official religion of Persia from 600 BCE to 650 CE (1250 years!!), but was suppressed by Islamic conquest of Persia from the 7th century.
...more

Saṅsāra or Saṃsāra (sanskrit: संसार), literally meaning “continuous flow”, is the cycle of birth, life, death, rebirth or reincarnation) within Buddhism, Hinduism, Bön, Jainism, Sikhism, and other Indian religions. In Buddhism, the consciousness (consciousness of the different senses, such as eye consciousness, ear consciousness etc.), at the moment of death, act as the seed for the spawning of the new consciousness in a new biological structure, conducive to the volitional (saṅkhāras) impulses at the moment of death (which are themselves affected by previous volitional impulses).
...more

In Indian religions, moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष mokṣa) or mukti (Sanskrit: मुक्ति), literally “release” (both from a root muc “to let loose, let go”), is the liberation from saṃsāra and the concomitant suffering involved in being subject to the cycle of repeated death and reincarnation.

...more

The noosphere (sometimes noösphere) is the sphere of human thought. The word derives from the Greek νοῦς (nous “mind”) and σφαῖρα (sphaira “sphere”), in lexical analogy to “atmosphere” and “biosphere”. It was introduced by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin in 1922 in his Cosmogenesis.

...more

Saṃsāra

Mitochondria (μίτος, mitos, “thread”, and χονδρίον, chondrion, “granule/grain-like”) are tiny organelles inside most eukaryotic cells which supply cellular energy (by releasing ATP), as well as other functions (cell growth & senescence, differentiation and signalling). Individual mitochondria can vary in size and the number in a cell by organism and cell-type. From wikipedia: There are two hypotheses about the origin of mitochondria: endosymbiotic and autogenous. The endosymbiotic hypothesis suggests that mitochondria were originally prokaryotic cells, capable of implementing oxidative mechanisms that were not possible for eukaryotic cells; they became endosymbionts living inside the eukaryote.
...more

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a molecule used to transfer chemical energy inside cells: a series of chemical reactions called the citric acid cycle (or Krebs cycle) allows the mitochondria in our cells to convert carbohydrates (i.e. glucose), fats and proteins into carbon dioxide (waste) and ATP, which is used for cell function. There is some evidence that a ketogenic diet is beneficial to the production of ATP by mitochondria within the brain.
...more

A neuron is an electrically excitable cell that processes and transmits information by electrical and chemical signaling. Chemical signaling occurs via synapses, specialized connections with other cells. Neurons connect to each other to form a neural network. Neurons are the core components of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral ganglia. A number of specialized types of neurons exist: sensory neurons respond to touch, sound, light and numerous other stimuli affecting cells of the sensory organs that then send signals to the spinal cord and brain; motor neurons receive signals from the brain and spinal cord, cause muscle contractions, and affect glands; and interneurons connect neurons to other neurons within the same region of the brain or spinal cord.
...more

A “ketogenic” diet is low in carbohydrates, high in fats and moderate in protein. When you consume carbohydrates (or excess protein), the body breaks it down into an easy-to-use sugar called glucose. It will also produce insulin, which “signals” the presence of glucose in your bloodstream – and when our insulin production becomes “fatigued”/maladapted (from too much glucose too often) we call it diabetes. From keto-fied: There are two main things that happen to glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis.
...more

“Transhumanism” is the intellectual movement and/or philosophy that believes in human augmentation as a means of “improving the human condition” i.e. eliminating suffering, extending life (and ultimately curing death) and providing humans with integrated tools and techniques (such as improved or entirely new sensory apparatus, communications and socialisation enhancements, and intelligence amplification). Transhumanists believe that we can – and ultimately must – engineer ourselves into a new species that is better suited for the environments and cultures we have created for ourselves.
...more

“User Experience”: the recognition that the interaction with systems (especially “smart” systems) goes beyond the user interface (UI). From wikipedia: “User experience (UX) is the way a person feels about using a product, system or service. User experience highlights the experiential, affective, meaningful and valuable aspects of human-computer interaction and product ownership, but it also includes a person’s perceptions of the practical aspects such as utility, ease of use and efficiency of the system.
...more

Zarathustra Spitama (زرتشت‎‎ Zartosht or زردشت Zardosht in Persian; Ζωροάστρης in Greek; and  in Avestan) was an Avestan-speaking Persian who (if he actually existed?) was the author of the Yasna Haptanghaiti and the Gathas, and the spiritual founder of what became known as Zoroastrianism. This was the official religion of Persia from 600 BCE to 650 CE (1250 years!!), but was suppressed by Islamic conquest of Persia from the 7th century.
...more

Saṅsāra or Saṃsāra (sanskrit: संसार), literally meaning “continuous flow”, is the cycle of birth, life, death, rebirth or reincarnation) within Buddhism, Hinduism, Bön, Jainism, Sikhism, and other Indian religions. In Buddhism, the consciousness (consciousness of the different senses, such as eye consciousness, ear consciousness etc.), at the moment of death, act as the seed for the spawning of the new consciousness in a new biological structure, conducive to the volitional (saṅkhāras) impulses at the moment of death (which are themselves affected by previous volitional impulses).
...more

In Indian religions, moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष mokṣa) or mukti (Sanskrit: मुक्ति), literally “release” (both from a root muc “to let loose, let go”), is the liberation from saṃsāra and the concomitant suffering involved in being subject to the cycle of repeated death and reincarnation.

...more

The noosphere (sometimes noösphere) is the sphere of human thought. The word derives from the Greek νοῦς (nous “mind”) and σφαῖρα (sphaira “sphere”), in lexical analogy to “atmosphere” and “biosphere”. It was introduced by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin in 1922 in his Cosmogenesis.

...more

Mokṣa

Mitochondria (μίτος, mitos, “thread”, and χονδρίον, chondrion, “granule/grain-like”) are tiny organelles inside most eukaryotic cells which supply cellular energy (by releasing ATP), as well as other functions (cell growth & senescence, differentiation and signalling). Individual mitochondria can vary in size and the number in a cell by organism and cell-type. From wikipedia: There are two hypotheses about the origin of mitochondria: endosymbiotic and autogenous. The endosymbiotic hypothesis suggests that mitochondria were originally prokaryotic cells, capable of implementing oxidative mechanisms that were not possible for eukaryotic cells; they became endosymbionts living inside the eukaryote.
...more

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a molecule used to transfer chemical energy inside cells: a series of chemical reactions called the citric acid cycle (or Krebs cycle) allows the mitochondria in our cells to convert carbohydrates (i.e. glucose), fats and proteins into carbon dioxide (waste) and ATP, which is used for cell function. There is some evidence that a ketogenic diet is beneficial to the production of ATP by mitochondria within the brain.
...more

A neuron is an electrically excitable cell that processes and transmits information by electrical and chemical signaling. Chemical signaling occurs via synapses, specialized connections with other cells. Neurons connect to each other to form a neural network. Neurons are the core components of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral ganglia. A number of specialized types of neurons exist: sensory neurons respond to touch, sound, light and numerous other stimuli affecting cells of the sensory organs that then send signals to the spinal cord and brain; motor neurons receive signals from the brain and spinal cord, cause muscle contractions, and affect glands; and interneurons connect neurons to other neurons within the same region of the brain or spinal cord.
...more

A “ketogenic” diet is low in carbohydrates, high in fats and moderate in protein. When you consume carbohydrates (or excess protein), the body breaks it down into an easy-to-use sugar called glucose. It will also produce insulin, which “signals” the presence of glucose in your bloodstream – and when our insulin production becomes “fatigued”/maladapted (from too much glucose too often) we call it diabetes. From keto-fied: There are two main things that happen to glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis.
...more

“Transhumanism” is the intellectual movement and/or philosophy that believes in human augmentation as a means of “improving the human condition” i.e. eliminating suffering, extending life (and ultimately curing death) and providing humans with integrated tools and techniques (such as improved or entirely new sensory apparatus, communications and socialisation enhancements, and intelligence amplification). Transhumanists believe that we can – and ultimately must – engineer ourselves into a new species that is better suited for the environments and cultures we have created for ourselves.
...more

“User Experience”: the recognition that the interaction with systems (especially “smart” systems) goes beyond the user interface (UI). From wikipedia: “User experience (UX) is the way a person feels about using a product, system or service. User experience highlights the experiential, affective, meaningful and valuable aspects of human-computer interaction and product ownership, but it also includes a person’s perceptions of the practical aspects such as utility, ease of use and efficiency of the system.
...more

Zarathustra Spitama (زرتشت‎‎ Zartosht or زردشت Zardosht in Persian; Ζωροάστρης in Greek; and  in Avestan) was an Avestan-speaking Persian who (if he actually existed?) was the author of the Yasna Haptanghaiti and the Gathas, and the spiritual founder of what became known as Zoroastrianism. This was the official religion of Persia from 600 BCE to 650 CE (1250 years!!), but was suppressed by Islamic conquest of Persia from the 7th century.
...more

Saṅsāra or Saṃsāra (sanskrit: संसार), literally meaning “continuous flow”, is the cycle of birth, life, death, rebirth or reincarnation) within Buddhism, Hinduism, Bön, Jainism, Sikhism, and other Indian religions. In Buddhism, the consciousness (consciousness of the different senses, such as eye consciousness, ear consciousness etc.), at the moment of death, act as the seed for the spawning of the new consciousness in a new biological structure, conducive to the volitional (saṅkhāras) impulses at the moment of death (which are themselves affected by previous volitional impulses).
...more

In Indian religions, moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष mokṣa) or mukti (Sanskrit: मुक्ति), literally “release” (both from a root muc “to let loose, let go”), is the liberation from saṃsāra and the concomitant suffering involved in being subject to the cycle of repeated death and reincarnation.

...more

The noosphere (sometimes noösphere) is the sphere of human thought. The word derives from the Greek νοῦς (nous “mind”) and σφαῖρα (sphaira “sphere”), in lexical analogy to “atmosphere” and “biosphere”. It was introduced by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin in 1922 in his Cosmogenesis.

...more

Noosphere

Mitochondria (μίτος, mitos, “thread”, and χονδρίον, chondrion, “granule/grain-like”) are tiny organelles inside most eukaryotic cells which supply cellular energy (by releasing ATP), as well as other functions (cell growth & senescence, differentiation and signalling). Individual mitochondria can vary in size and the number in a cell by organism and cell-type. From wikipedia: There are two hypotheses about the origin of mitochondria: endosymbiotic and autogenous. The endosymbiotic hypothesis suggests that mitochondria were originally prokaryotic cells, capable of implementing oxidative mechanisms that were not possible for eukaryotic cells; they became endosymbionts living inside the eukaryote.
...more

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a molecule used to transfer chemical energy inside cells: a series of chemical reactions called the citric acid cycle (or Krebs cycle) allows the mitochondria in our cells to convert carbohydrates (i.e. glucose), fats and proteins into carbon dioxide (waste) and ATP, which is used for cell function. There is some evidence that a ketogenic diet is beneficial to the production of ATP by mitochondria within the brain.
...more

A neuron is an electrically excitable cell that processes and transmits information by electrical and chemical signaling. Chemical signaling occurs via synapses, specialized connections with other cells. Neurons connect to each other to form a neural network. Neurons are the core components of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral ganglia. A number of specialized types of neurons exist: sensory neurons respond to touch, sound, light and numerous other stimuli affecting cells of the sensory organs that then send signals to the spinal cord and brain; motor neurons receive signals from the brain and spinal cord, cause muscle contractions, and affect glands; and interneurons connect neurons to other neurons within the same region of the brain or spinal cord.
...more

A “ketogenic” diet is low in carbohydrates, high in fats and moderate in protein. When you consume carbohydrates (or excess protein), the body breaks it down into an easy-to-use sugar called glucose. It will also produce insulin, which “signals” the presence of glucose in your bloodstream – and when our insulin production becomes “fatigued”/maladapted (from too much glucose too often) we call it diabetes. From keto-fied: There are two main things that happen to glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis.
...more

“Transhumanism” is the intellectual movement and/or philosophy that believes in human augmentation as a means of “improving the human condition” i.e. eliminating suffering, extending life (and ultimately curing death) and providing humans with integrated tools and techniques (such as improved or entirely new sensory apparatus, communications and socialisation enhancements, and intelligence amplification). Transhumanists believe that we can – and ultimately must – engineer ourselves into a new species that is better suited for the environments and cultures we have created for ourselves.
...more

“User Experience”: the recognition that the interaction with systems (especially “smart” systems) goes beyond the user interface (UI). From wikipedia: “User experience (UX) is the way a person feels about using a product, system or service. User experience highlights the experiential, affective, meaningful and valuable aspects of human-computer interaction and product ownership, but it also includes a person’s perceptions of the practical aspects such as utility, ease of use and efficiency of the system.
...more

Zarathustra Spitama (زرتشت‎‎ Zartosht or زردشت Zardosht in Persian; Ζωροάστρης in Greek; and  in Avestan) was an Avestan-speaking Persian who (if he actually existed?) was the author of the Yasna Haptanghaiti and the Gathas, and the spiritual founder of what became known as Zoroastrianism. This was the official religion of Persia from 600 BCE to 650 CE (1250 years!!), but was suppressed by Islamic conquest of Persia from the 7th century.
...more

Saṅsāra or Saṃsāra (sanskrit: संसार), literally meaning “continuous flow”, is the cycle of birth, life, death, rebirth or reincarnation) within Buddhism, Hinduism, Bön, Jainism, Sikhism, and other Indian religions. In Buddhism, the consciousness (consciousness of the different senses, such as eye consciousness, ear consciousness etc.), at the moment of death, act as the seed for the spawning of the new consciousness in a new biological structure, conducive to the volitional (saṅkhāras) impulses at the moment of death (which are themselves affected by previous volitional impulses).
...more

In Indian religions, moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष mokṣa) or mukti (Sanskrit: मुक्ति), literally “release” (both from a root muc “to let loose, let go”), is the liberation from saṃsāra and the concomitant suffering involved in being subject to the cycle of repeated death and reincarnation.

...more

The noosphere (sometimes noösphere) is the sphere of human thought. The word derives from the Greek νοῦς (nous “mind”) and σφαῖρα (sphaira “sphere”), in lexical analogy to “atmosphere” and “biosphere”. It was introduced by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin in 1922 in his Cosmogenesis.

...more