Mesopotamian Religion

Mesopotamian religion refers to the religious beliefs and practices of the civilizations of ancient Mesopotamia, particularly Sumer, Akkad, Assyria and Babylonia between circa 3500 BC and 400 AD, after which they largely gave way to Syriac Christianity. A few traces remained among Assyrian communities in isolated pockets of what had been Assyria until the 10th century AD, with the very latest attestation being found in this region in the 16th century AD.

Apocrypha

The apocrypha are books deleted from the Abrahamic old testament: Tobias Judith Jubillees - mentions the nephilim Enoch - mentions the nephilim Esther Baruch Sirach Maccabees

Religion

Religion appears to be a philosophy and a social construct; a memeplex that promulgates and prolongs itself by the structures, edicts and forms it mandates (or less often “recommends”). Religious or spiritual behaviour (ritual, spirituality, mythology and magical thinking or animism) may be as old as the Paleolithic era – between 300,000 and 30,000 years ago i.e. coinciding with the first appearance of Homo neanderthalensis and Homo sapiens. (It’s generally accepted that religion “emerged” some 50,000 years ago, marking the transition from the middle to the upper Paleolithic era, as burial artefacts and cave paintings appear to provide evidence of a belief in “supernatural” entities.

Saṅkhāra

Saṅkhāra (Pali; Devanagari: सङ्खार) or saṃskāra (Sanskrit; Devanagari: संस्कार) is a word meaning ‘that which has been put together’ and ‘that which puts together’. In the first (passive) sense, saṅkhāra refers to conditioned phenomena generally but specifically to all mental “dispositions”. These are called ‘volitional formations’ because they are formed as a result of volition. In the second (active) sense of the word, saṅkhāra refers to that faculty of the mind/brain apparatus (sankhara-khandha) that puts together those formations.

Heaven

In most religions, Heaven is a transcendental realm in which people who have died continue to exist in an afterlife. The term “heaven” may refer to the physical heavens, the sky or the seemingly endless expanse of the universe beyond, which is the traditional literal meaning of the term in English. The term in English has also typically been used to refer to the plane of existence of an afterlife (often held to exist in another realm) in various religions and spiritual philosophies, often described as the holiest possible place, accessible by people according to various standards of divinity, goodness, piety, faith or other virtues.

Planck

The Planck length, denoted ℓP, is a unit of length, equal to 1.616229(38)×10−35 metres. It is a base unit in the system of Planck units, developed by physicist Max Planck. The Planck length can be defined from three fundamental physical constants: the speed of light in a vacuum, the Planck constant, and the gravitational constant. Planck time is the time required for light to travel in a vacuum a distance of 1 Planck length, which is approximately 5.

Ogdoad

In Egyptian mythology, the Ogdoad (Greek “ογδοάς”, the eightfold) were eight deities worshipped in Hermopolis during what is called the Old Kingdom, the third through sixth dynasties, dated between 2686 to 2134 BC. First it was a cult having Hathor and Ra; later changing to a cult where Hathor and Thoth were the main deities over a much larger number of deities; and even later, Ra was assimilated into Atum-Ra through a merger with Atum of the Ennead cosmogony.

Metaphysics

Metaphysics (from the Greek words μετά (metá) (“beyond” or “after”) and φυσικά (physiká) (“physics”)) is philosophy or philosophic thought about the nature of reality: what IS, and its properties. For example: the world appears to contain many “things” – physical objects (like apples) are called particulars, and possess properties (or universals). There are also non-physical abstract objects, like numbers – and properties themselves can be considered abstract objects. Ontology is the the study of existence: Rene Descarte proposed, “Cogito ero sum” (I think therefore I am).

PQQ

Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a coenzyme and antioxidant that may support mitochondrial function and biogenesis, provide cardioprotection (e.g. limiting the damage done to the heart by a myocardial infarction), and stimulate nerve growth factors in the brain, leading to improved memory and brain function. Most studies thus far (it seems) have been performed on rats, although there is a large body of anecdotal evidence from human biohackers. See https://selfhacked.com/2014/09/11/pqq-review/ When combined with CoQ10, PQQ may significantly preserve and enhance memory, attention, and cognition in ageing humans.

CoQ10

Last but certainly not least is coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an antioxidant present in all cells and particularly concentrated in the mitochondria. CoQ10 participates in the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)—the high-energy packets that fuel our minds and bodies—as part of the electron transport chain and also protects the mitochondria against free-radical damage.