Topics of Interest

There does not need to be a specific reason, goal or objective for learning. Learning for its own sake can be very rewarding. There are a number of topics of interest that I like to read about, research, and consider; if it's something I really, really want to learn then I should probably implement some different learning hacks. Topics of interest include: entrepreneurship, leadership and opportunity discovery philosophy, psychology and meditation economics and anthropology history, religion/theosophy & alchemy (yes, even alchemy) language science & mathematics medicine Also, le topic informatique:
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There are a number of hacks that can make learning easier or more effective. Active Reading describe Elaborative Interrogation & Self Explanation The ‘Feynman technique’ for actively digesting, understanding and remembering a topic of interest involves reading/researching, then explaining (as if to someone else) the key points of what you're trying to learn. This highlights gaps in your supposed knowledge, and probably also tricks the brain into assigning a higher importance to it, thus enabling better recall.
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Learning Hacks

There does not need to be a specific reason, goal or objective for learning. Learning for its own sake can be very rewarding. There are a number of topics of interest that I like to read about, research, and consider; if it's something I really, really want to learn then I should probably implement some different learning hacks. Topics of interest include: entrepreneurship, leadership and opportunity discovery philosophy, psychology and meditation economics and anthropology history, religion/theosophy & alchemy (yes, even alchemy) language science & mathematics medicine Also, le topic informatique:
...more

There are a number of hacks that can make learning easier or more effective. Active Reading describe Elaborative Interrogation & Self Explanation The ‘Feynman technique’ for actively digesting, understanding and remembering a topic of interest involves reading/researching, then explaining (as if to someone else) the key points of what you're trying to learn. This highlights gaps in your supposed knowledge, and probably also tricks the brain into assigning a higher importance to it, thus enabling better recall.
...more