Kenosis

(in Christian theology) the renunciation of the divine nature, at least in part, by Christ in the Incarnation. … from Greek kenōsis ‘an emptying’, from kenoein ‘to empty’, from kenos ‘empty’, with biblical allusion (Phil. 2:7) to Greek heauton ekenōse, literally ‘emptied himself’. The kenotic ethic is the ethic of Jesus, considered as the ethic of sacrifice. The Philippians passage urges believers to imitate Christ’s self-emptying. In this interpretation, Paul was not primarily putting forth a theory about God in this passage, rather he was using God’s humility exhibited in the incarnation event as a call for Christians to be similarly subservient to others.

Language

Language is the medium for the transmission of ideas: the vector for meme activity, perhaps. It also appears to be something which differentiates humans from other animals (although perhaps whale-song or even bird-call is more complex than suspected). In “Human Traces”, Sebastian Faulk suggests (through his characters) that language developed with consciousness; the two are inextricable. Further, he suggests that our ability to abstract (reality is an abstraction) the world and hear the voices of leaders/kings/god are both part of (the main function of?

Hades

Hades (Άδης or Ἀΐδας; from Greek ᾍδης, Hadēs, originally Ἅιδης, Haidēs or Άΐδης, Aidēs, meaning “the unseen”) refers both to the ancient Greek underworld, the abode of Hades, and to the god of the underworld. Hades in Homer referred just to the god; the genitive ᾍδου, Haidou, was an elision to denote locality: “[the house/dominion] of Hades”. Eventually, the nominative, too, came to designate the abode of the dead. In Greek mythology, Hades is the oldest male child of Cronus and Rhea.

Sanskrit

Sanskrit (/ˈsænskrɪt/; संस्कृतम् saṃskṛtam [səmskr̩t̪əm], or संस्कृत saṃskṛta, originally संस्कृता वाक् saṃskṛtā vāk, “refined speech”) is the primary liturgical language of Hinduism, a philosophical language in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and a literary language that was in use as a lingua franca in the Indian cultural zone. It is a standardised dialect of the Old Indo-Aryan language, originating as Vedic Sanskrit and tracing its linguistic ancestry back to Proto-Indo-Iranian and Proto-Indo-European.

Gaia

Gaea (pronounced /ˈɡeɪ.ə/ or /ˈɡaɪ.ə/; from Ancient Greek Γαῖα “land” or “earth”; also Gæa, Gaia or Gea, from Koine and Modern Greek Γῆ) is the primal Greek goddess personifying the Earth, the Greek version of “Mother Nature” or the Earth Mother, of which the earliest reference to the term is the Mycenaean Greek ma-ka (transliterated as ma-ga), “Mother Gaia”, written in Linear B syllabic script. Gaia is a primordial deity (god) in the Ancient Greek pantheon and considered a Mother Titan or Great Titan.

Chthonic

Chthonic (from Greek χθόνιος — chthonios, “in, under, or beneath the earth”, from χθών — chthōn “earth”; pertaining to the Earth; earthy; subterranean) designates, or pertains to, deities or spirits of the underworld, especially in relation to Greek religion. Greek khthon is one of several words for “earth”; it typically refers to the interior of the soil, rather than the living surface of the land (as Gaia or Ge does) or the land as territory (as khora (χώρα) does).